All posts tagged: ethical fashionista

DIY fabric accessories – extend the life of your clothes

Accessories are a girl’s best friend because they can dress up a boring outfit (or better yet, ‘update’ the same outfit you’ve been wearing on rotation!) and you can then get more life out of our clothes. I am going to share a simple way to dress up an outfit with fabric flowers. It’s a great way to upcycle scrap material or old clothes you don’t use anymore! For this DIY I decided to make a fabric flower shield necklace which can be worn over plain dresses or tops to dress them up. You could also sew the flowers to an existing top or make a brooch out of them. The colour of the fabric gives your outfit an instant boost, which means I can get away with wearing that same black maxi dress more often! What you’ll need Fabric torn into strips (3cm wide x any length) – you could use anything! Think old shirts, leftover scraps of material etc. Fabric glue Felt OR a large enough patch of fabric Ribbon (I used the …

My guest post at Recycled Fashion

2011 was the year I achieved a few resolutions by the way of the 3Things Project by Oxfam, one of them being to become an Ethical Fashionista. This involved upcycling and recycling clothes. During this time I discovered a mass of great blogs out there who were doing the same thing, one of them was Recycled Fashion. Recycled Fashion’s motto is awesome: So, when the lovely Erica from Recycled Fashion decided to take some much deserved time off over Christmas, I offered to do a guest post on my favourite recycled fashion item: the scarf! One of the easiest things to find in a thrift store, and one of the easiest fashion accessories to achieve – I wanted to show everyone my favourite accessory. You can check out my guest post here.

Perth Fashion Festival for the eco enthusiast

The Perth Fashion Festival starts today and there are plenty of events on for the eco-conscious fashionista. I have discussed before the benefits of buying recycled, pre-loved, or vintage clothes and it seems the Perth Fashion Festival have realised fashion isn’t just about expensive high end clothing – first and foremost it’s the creativity behind being fashionable. The following events are great ways to be inspired and learn all about how to buy and style pre-loved clothes (i.e. things that already exist in your wardrobe), or recycled/vintage clothes (that you buy secondhand) or even finding local ‘handmade’ designers. Popsicle Showcasing local designers in pop-up display around locations in Northbridge. Includes a old favourite of mine She Seldom Blushes and a great sustainable designer On A Whim (featured above). Check the website for details. [All day, every day] Restyle A showcase of innovative looks on the runway that use 100% recycled op-shop pieces. A great way to be inspired to op-shop and thrift your way fashionable. Located at Fashion Central. [11.45am Saturday 24 September) Restyle Workshops …

Tsumami Kanzashi

Eco-fashion tip: one of the easiest ways to update your wardrobe is with new accessories. My latest love is cute brooches which can sometimes also double as hair accessories – so when I found myself at the Baba-dee Productions stall at the Made on the Left markets, I knew I had to have a bit of this tsumami kanzashi action! What is tsumami kanzashi you ask? Basically it’s origami style folding of small silk squares to form shapes (typically flowers) and are then glued and sewed together. They are typically worn as hair accessories. Baba-dee Productions uses vintage buttons for the centre which I thought was an extra cute touch, and had then in both hair clips and brooches. Though their etsy store collection is somewhat small, there was a huge variety at the markets – so I definitely suggest you get down to the next one!

My plastic fantastic bag

I found the amazing Bags Revolt  stall at the last Made on the Left Market and instantly fell in love with this bag (which I subsequently bought). I love the colours. I love the size. I love the fact that it’s made from old plastic bags! Talk about an upcycling hero! Venezuelan born artist Patricia Acuña has only lived in Perth since February last year and we’re sadly losing her to the East Coast soon! According to her blog, Patricia decided to weave her own bags after moving to Perth and subsequently took sewing and weaving lessons, but it was her decision to use old plastic bags that really make her products special. It is clear from the business card/product tag that came with the bag and also from her website, that Patricia supports a sustainable world and has chosen to use plastic for weaving in order to create awareness of the environmental problems plastic bags and other household ‘junk’ is causing. “The problem I have set out to tackle is the plastic phenomenon. The …

Upcycling – old to new

Previously: Recycling clothes. Continuing my 3things pledge to become an ethical fashionista, I have been on the challenge to discover the wonderful world of upcycling. Upcycling is the process of converting a somewhat useless product into something of value. In the world of fashion upcycling can also be referred to as reconstruction, refashion or reclaiming. There is even the term ‘trashion’ (trash+fashion). The best part about upcycling is you can use nearly everything in your wardrobe again and make it into something new. WHY you ask? Why not!? Why not use something you already have and make it into something new? It’s exciting, it’s crafty and there is a definite sense of achievement when you realise nothing went to waste when making that item. Best of all it can be virtually free if you use something you already have. Upcycling yourself involves at least some basic sewing skills for small things, and a sewing machine for the more complex things (or be willing to pay a tailor or your Mum to do it for you).You …

Recycling clothes – seek and you shall find

Previously: Becoming an ethical fashionista The road to my becoming an ethical fashionista has challenged the way I  look at fashion and shopping. It can no longer be about satisfying an immediate want and going to the cheapest fashion store to buy it. I have to consider what my ethical choices are and the first consideration should be looking at what already exists – second-hand or vintage clothes. With so much waste in the world, fashion certainly contributes with its ever changing trends encouraging people update their wardrobe constantly and subsequently throw away old, out of fashion clothes. But where do these old clothes go? Either the bin (I hope not!) or to goodwill clothes bins for recycling. Firstly, let’s get two things straight. I might refer to things as ‘second-hand’, ‘recycled’, ‘op-shop’ or ‘vintage’ – what’s the difference? The only difference is, specifically referring to something as ‘vintage’ refers to clothes typically from the 70’s and earlier (and are almost ‘in demand’ for their uniqueness) they are usually harder to source. Most of them …

Becoming an ethical fashionista

As I have mentioned before, I recently made an ethical fashion pledge via Oxfam’s ‘3things to change the world’ initiative. Whilst I later expanded this to becoming an ethical shopper (in all facets of my consumerism), the fact still remains – I love fashion and I can’t give it up, so I had to find an ethical and sustainable way of being involved in fashion. How can being an ethical fashionista ‘change the world’? Ever wondered how clothes from the 30’s, 40’s, 50’s, 60’s and so on are still found in good condition today? Do you think most of today’s mass produced clothes will last that long? Ever wondered how many new clothes you’ve bought, and subsequently how many old clothes you ‘threw out’? Hopefully most of you give old clothes to charity, but in the UK in 2009 it was estimated that 63% of people’s old clothes go to landfill.   Most of these clothes are perfectly fine, or at least most of the fabric is still in perfect condition. Ever wondered how a top …