All posts tagged: cruelty free

Awesome Christmas shopping (that you can feel good about)

Oh my goodness tomorrow is December. That means there are 25 days left to do your Christmas shopping! I’ve discussed that Christmas has become a somewhat consumerist nightmare, but I also understand that gift giving at Christmas is a hard tradition to break. It’s more about being smart about your Christmas shopping – and buying sustainable and eco friendly gifts is definitely something to consider. So, here is a list of great online stores that offer unique gifts that you can feel good about buying: Eco Toys http://www.ecotoys.com.au An awesome website absolutely full of sustainable and eco friendly toys, clothing, furniture – you name it, they’ve got it. There’s nothing more disturbing than a kids room full of plastic toys (that happen to break far too easily). These are the types of toys that become heirlooms! (featured above: Bajo mini rocking horse, Dobbin & Drum teepee & Wishbone bike) Ethikl http://www.ethikl.com.au/ Ethikl is somewhat of an online marketplace selling eco friendly, ethical and fair trade products direct from the artists themselves. There’s a massive range from beauty to bags to home and garden. A …

Daily Inspiration : The Kind Life

I’ve been very lazy and busy lately, which is never a good combination. Whilst this has meant very little blogging action from me, it certainly has not meant I’ve become lazy with my eco behaviour – in fact I still read many articles from other green bloggers in my spare time. It’s great to be inspired from people all around the world who all have the same cause in mind – saving this planet. So, from now on, when I hit a bump in the road, rather than stop blogging, I’ll just keep reading and share with you what I find. Today’s find was rather random – a link on a news website to a People magazine article on Alicia Silverstone (American actress most famous for her role as a shopaholic ditz in the movie ‘Clueless’). What made me click through to this article on an actress? The title “Alicia Silverstone: Secondhand Shopper with a Cause“. I suddenly remembered that Alicia is an avid vegan and animals rights protester, but I didn’t know she was …

Ethical shopping – it’s all about reading the label

I made a pledge via 3things to choose vintage/pre-loved clothes over brand new ‘sweatshop’ cheap clothes. In hindsight it was an odd thing to choose, but I knew that I was going the easy route of shopping at super cheap fashion clothes stores without considering where these clothes came from, who made them, in what conditions and at what cost to the environment. What I’ve since decided is I’m going to expand this pledge to something bigger – to shop ethically and not just clothes, but everything I consume. So before I can fully become an ethical shopper and fulfil my pledge, I first had to find out what it all meant. What is ethical shopping (or being an ‘ethical consumer’)? One of the biggest key words here is “considering” – and consideration is all about respect, concern and thoughtfulness. Considering how the product will affect other people or animals Considering whether the production of the product has been made using sustainable practices Choosing products that are of good quality Choosing products that are themselves …

Are you using dangerous chemicals in your home?

Think about the roles that the chemicals in things like cigarettes, drugs and pesticides play in the media. The general message is that they are extremely dangerous for our health and that we should avoid contact wherever possible. This is why it shocks a lot of people to discover that the greatest risk of exposure to synthetic organic chemicals comes from within our own homes. In Australia, the chemicals used in our homes are the least controlled and regulated. This means most Australian households have hundreds of dangerous compounds lurking in their kitchens, bathrooms and laundries that have not been put through adequate (and sometimes any) testing or certification processes. And not only are these potions harmful to ourselves, but the environment is also suffering. Given the poor standard of chemical regulation in Australia it is a fair assumption that we cannot trust industry with our health. We need to take the power back into our own hands by arming ourselves with a little knowledge and acting accordingly. The only way to limit damage to …